thesassylorax

jackthevulture:

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

disney-garden:

lordsofdisney

Please read.. and reblog. For all the children who are/feel excluded. For all the children who have no friend. Because it is important. Because we ALL are important !

This is exactly why Kyle and I are having a Beauty and the Beast wedding. Because we have both felt rejected by society, and we have found solace in each other. 

It is through each other that we found and learned to love ourselves. 

If you ever wonder why I like the gaston character as my favorite villain this is why. He portrays something that I have pretty much noticed all my life.
I was bullied quite a bit when I was growing up, especially in my awkward middle School years. Society found nothing wrong with it , even going as far as to say it was normal for a child to go through what I was going through.
It’s sad but I made it through that.
When I look at gaston I see something I overcame as a child and it gives me a lot of strength now to know that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and that it’s the personality that truly makes someone beautiful.
That’s why I never judge anyone by their appearances but I actually get to know them.

This is why I love Beauty and the Beast so much. Its got a HELL of a lot of depth to it. For me it goes WAY beyond most other princess movies. And what it has to say is amazing.

Theres also this sort of parallel between Gaston and Beast where, in the beginning, beast wanted to own belle, just as gaston did. Belle only started to fall for the beast after he let her go. He let her go twice during the movie, the second time is when she finally returns to him and tells him that she loves him. She loves him because he does not seek to own her, and because he puts her feelings and emotions before his.

I just really love their relationship and I love this movie. More like Beauty and the Beast please.

It’s my second favorite Disney movie😊

neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Shown are fMRI scans across all subjects in the study. The yellow and red areas in Section A represent parts of the brain that are activated while subjects are forming “gist memories” of pictures viewed. Section B represents areas of increased activation, shown in yellow and red, as detailed memories are being formed. Credit: Image courtesy of Jagust Lab)
Researchers find neural compensation in people with Alzheimer’s-related protein
The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley researchers.
The findings, published today (Sunday, Sept. 14) in the journal Nature Neuroscience, could help explain how some older adults with beta-amyloid deposits in their brain retain normal cognitive function while others develop dementia.
“This study provides evidence that there is plasticity or compensation ability in the aging brain that appears to be beneficial, even in the face of beta-amyloid accumulation,” said study principal investigator Dr. William Jagust, a professor with joint appointments at UC Berkeley’s Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, the School of Public Health and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Previous studies have shown a link between increased brain activity and beta-amyloid deposits, but it was unclear whether the activity was tied to better mental performance.
The study included 22 healthy young adults and 49 older adults who had no signs of mental decline. Brain scans showed that 16 of the older subjects had beta-amyloid deposits, while the remaining 55 adults did not.
The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to track the brain activity of subjects in the process of memorizing pictures of various scenes. Afterwards, the researchers tested the subjects’ “gist memory” by asking them to confirm whether a written description of a scene – such as a boy doing a handstand – corresponded to a picture previously viewed. Subjects were then asked to confirm whether specific written details of a scene – such as the color of the boy’s shirt – were true.
“Generally, the groups performed equally well in the tasks, but it turned out that for people with beta-amyloid deposits in the brain, the more detailed and complex their memory, the more brain activity there was,” said Jagust. “It seems that their brain has found a way to compensate for the presence of the proteins associated with Alzheimer’s.”
What remains unclear, said Jagust, is why some people with beta-amyloid deposits are better at using different parts of their brain than others. Previous studies suggest that people who engage in mentally stimulating activities throughout their lives have lower levels of beta-amyloid.
“I think it’s very possible that people who spend a lifetime involved in cognitively stimulating activity have brains that are better able to adapt to potential damage,” said Jagust.

I wish this was the case for my Grandpa. I am really happy that so many studies are being done in this area!

neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Shown are fMRI scans across all subjects in the study. The yellow and red areas in Section A represent parts of the brain that are activated while subjects are forming “gist memories” of pictures viewed. Section B represents areas of increased activation, shown in yellow and red, as detailed memories are being formed. Credit: Image courtesy of Jagust Lab)

Researchers find neural compensation in people with Alzheimer’s-related protein

The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley researchers.

The findings, published today (Sunday, Sept. 14) in the journal Nature Neuroscience, could help explain how some older adults with beta-amyloid deposits in their brain retain normal cognitive function while others develop dementia.

“This study provides evidence that there is plasticity or compensation ability in the aging brain that appears to be beneficial, even in the face of beta-amyloid accumulation,” said study principal investigator Dr. William Jagust, a professor with joint appointments at UC Berkeley’s Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, the School of Public Health and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Previous studies have shown a link between increased brain activity and beta-amyloid deposits, but it was unclear whether the activity was tied to better mental performance.

The study included 22 healthy young adults and 49 older adults who had no signs of mental decline. Brain scans showed that 16 of the older subjects had beta-amyloid deposits, while the remaining 55 adults did not.

The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to track the brain activity of subjects in the process of memorizing pictures of various scenes. Afterwards, the researchers tested the subjects’ “gist memory” by asking them to confirm whether a written description of a scene – such as a boy doing a handstand – corresponded to a picture previously viewed. Subjects were then asked to confirm whether specific written details of a scene – such as the color of the boy’s shirt – were true.

“Generally, the groups performed equally well in the tasks, but it turned out that for people with beta-amyloid deposits in the brain, the more detailed and complex their memory, the more brain activity there was,” said Jagust. “It seems that their brain has found a way to compensate for the presence of the proteins associated with Alzheimer’s.”

What remains unclear, said Jagust, is why some people with beta-amyloid deposits are better at using different parts of their brain than others. Previous studies suggest that people who engage in mentally stimulating activities throughout their lives have lower levels of beta-amyloid.

“I think it’s very possible that people who spend a lifetime involved in cognitively stimulating activity have brains that are better able to adapt to potential damage,” said Jagust.

I wish this was the case for my Grandpa. I am really happy that so many studies are being done in this area!

micdotcom
micdotcom:

Phillies pitcher ejected after taunting fans with gross gesture

Jonathan Papelbon showed how not to leave a game Sunday afternoon in Philadelphia.
Shortly after surrendering four runs in the ninth inning of a 5-4 loss to the Marlins, the combustible Phillies closer left the field in ways that brought back memories of John Rocker at his most unstrung. As if getting booed by more than 30,000 angry Philadelphia fans wasn’t already bad enough, Papelbon managed to be ejected by umpire Joe West for grabbing his crotch in the direction of the fans on his way to the dugout.
But the disgusting behavior wasn’t over yet


Good!

micdotcom:

Phillies pitcher ejected after taunting fans with gross gesture

Jonathan Papelbon showed how not to leave a game Sunday afternoon in Philadelphia.

Shortly after surrendering four runs in the ninth inning of a 5-4 loss to the Marlins, the combustible Phillies closer left the field in ways that brought back memories of John Rocker at his most unstrung. As if getting booed by more than 30,000 angry Philadelphia fans wasn’t already bad enough, Papelbon managed to be ejected by umpire Joe West for grabbing his crotch in the direction of the fans on his way to the dugout.

But the disgusting behavior wasn’t over yet

Good!